In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens: Womanist Prose by Alice Walker


Description
Product Description
A collection of early personal and political essays from the Pulitzer Prize–winning author of The Color Purple.
What is a womanist? Alice Walker sets out to define the concept in this anthology of early essays and other nonfiction pieces. As she outlines it, a womanist is a person who prefers to side with the oppressed: with women, with people of color, with the poor. As a writer, Walker has always taken such people as her primary subjects, and her search for paths toward self-possession and freedom always holds out hope for the transformative power of compassion and love. Whether she’s taking on nuclear proliferation, the promise and problems of the civil rights movement, or her own creative process, Walker always brings to bear a fearless determination to tell the truth.
This ebook features an illustrated biography of Alice Walker including rare photos from the author’s personal collection.

Review
“[In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens] reflects not only ideas but a life that has breathed color, sound, and soul into fiction and poetry—and into our lives as well.” —San Francisco Chronicle

“What is said from the depths of oppression illuminates all other oppressions.” —New Statesman
About the Author
Alice Walker (b. 1944), one of the United States’ preeminent writers, is an award-winning author of novels, stories, essays, and poetry. In 1983, Walker became the first African-American woman to win a Pulitzer Prize for fiction with her novel The Color Purple, which also won the National Book Award. Her other novels include The Third Life of Grange Copeland, Meridian, The Temple of My Familiar, and Possessing the Secret of Joy. In her public life, Walker has worked to address problems of injustice, inequality, and poverty as an activist, teacher, and public intellectual.

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